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Posts tagged “shamanism

WHAT İS “OBOO” ?

Mountain spirits and other powerful gazriin ezen spirits are worshiped at special shrines called oboo, which are tall piles of rocks and tree branches. An oboo is roughly conical in shape, about 6-10 feet tall. When passing by an oboo travelers are required to walk around it three times and place a rock on it. In doing this not only is a person showing respect for the spirit, which would be the least required of him, but in symbolically by adding to the spirit’s power by adding the rock he is receiving windhorse and good luck for his journey. In order to get more windhorse (hiimori) and buyanhishig a person might also make and offering of liquor, milk, or butter. Sometimes car parts will be hung from the tree branches to assure that there will be no brakedowns.

 

 

TUVA, KYZYL

TUVA, KYZYL

Oboo are also the sites of several ceremonies during the year that nearby families or clans would celebrate in honor of the local spirit as well as Father Heaven and Mother Earth and other shamanist spirits. During the celebration of the lunar New Year, or White Moon (Tsagaan Sar), an oboo is made of snow and offerings are made to Father Heaven. Nearby a fire is built that is not allowed to go out for a month; this fire is called Tengeriin oboo (oboo of Father Heaven). Oboos not only represent mountains, but by their upward pointing nature they also represent a point of closer contact between heaven and earth, just as a mountain top is considered to be closer to Tenger and therefore spiritually powerful.

Altai Mountains

Altai Mountains

In Mongolia and Siberia certain mountains and mountain ranges are considered especially sacred. One of the most famous is Burhan Haldun, which lies in the region where Chinggis Khaan was born. It has been sacred since prehistoric times, and burial sites for shamans dot it’s slopes. The Altai Mountains in Mongolia, Tuva, and southern Siberia are considered sacred, and the spirit of the Altai is known as Altai Aab (Father Altai). When shamans in the Altai region travel to visit the clan spirit, they may first travel to the ger of Altai Aab to pay respects. The Sayan Mountains on the border of Buryatia, Mongolia, and Tuva are home to several powerful spirits, and a special type of shaman, the hadaasha, performs rituals to honor these spirits. The thirty-three baatar of Bukhe Biligte Tenger in the Tunken Valley of the Sayan Mountains are an especially important family of spirits. The capital of Mongolia, Ulaan Baatar, was founded at it’s present site almost 400 years ago because of it’s location in a spiritually powerful spot. It lies in a circular valley surrounded by four holy mountains that are revered throughout Mongolia. The four mountains include the Bogd Uul (literally, “Holy Mountain”) to the south, Songino Hairhan to the west, Chinggeltei to the north, and Bayanzurh to the east. Of these, the southern and western mountains are especially interesting. The Bogd Uul is the home of the thunderbird Han garid, a huge bird that can cover the sun and moon with it’s wings and fly into outer space. Songino Hairhan is the home of the spirit of the shaman Songino, who is said to have lived at the time of the founding of Ulaan Baatar. The siting of this city in a circle among four holy mountains located in each of the four directions ensured it’s protections and blessings from all the spirits residing in such a spiritually powerful place.

TUVA, KYZYL

TUVA, KYZYL

TUVA, KYZYL

TUVA, KYZYL

Read more : Sacred Mountains and Trees

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Altai kai-Kezer Tash


Altai Kai – Bahadır’ın Sözü

Bu güzel Altay’da,
Halı gibi güzel vadide,
Ak dağın eteğinde,
Ak denizin kıyısında
Hayatını boşuna yaşamayan
Bahadırımız yaşamış.

Oraya baksa, öyle değil,
Buraya baksa, böyle değil,
Oraya baksa, ayı gibi,
Buraya baksa, kurt gibi,
Korku sözlerini o bilmez,
Bahadırımız yaşamış.

Altay tarafından kutsanmış:
Attığı oku düz vurur,
Bindiği atı görkemli,
Yaptıkları dosdoğru
Söylediği sözü düşündürücü.
Dinleyin, dinleyin, dinleyin!

Sonuçta bahadır demiş:
”Gelir, gelir o günler de
Halı gibi güzel vadide,
Bu güzel Altay’da
Değişir, değişir yaşamımız!”

Altay’ıma zamanlar gelir,
Ulusumuz kötüleşip (ahlaksızca davranıp) yaşar,
Acı zehirli suyu içip,
Ulusumun sayı azalır
Altay’da, Altay’da, Altay’da!

Kişi, kişi anlaşmadan,
Örf ve adet ile savaşır.
Başka halk gelip,
Başka örf adetleri öğretir.
Öğretir, öğretir, öğretir!

Bir gün Altay’a
Genç Altay bahadır gelir.
Ulusumuz uyanır,
Altay ulusu birleşir,
İlerler, ilerler hayatımız!


Shamanism cuts across all faiths

“Because it is not an organized religion as such, but rather a spiritual practice, shamanism cuts across all faiths and creeds, reaching deep levels of ancestral memory. As a primal belief system, which precedes established religion, it has its own symbolism and cosmology, inhabited by beings, gods, and totems, who display similar characteristics although they appear in various forms, depending upon their places of origin.”

~ John Matthews, “The Celtic Shaman”

Kuragino-Kyzyl

Kuragino-Kyzyl


Shamans of Tuva

Shamans of Tuva. With the split of Soviet Union spiritual and religious practices used to arise in former Soviet republics. New forms of traditional practices appeared to be, forms never existed before. Today practicing shamans in Tuva are organised into several competitive societies. They are officially registered to the state as practicing religious organisations, they pay taxes, have they own office, secretary and stuff, receive their clients to the cabinets of former state medical clinics. One of the most interesting and marginal societies between them- “Adyg Eeren” (“Spirit of Bear”) is located to the former clinic of the capital of Republic Tuva- Kyzyl. The chief of the society, shaman named Adyg- Tulush Kara-ool Dopchun-oglu is one of the descendors of an ancient tuvinian clan of bear. Each shaman in Adyg- Eeren is a caracteristic personality with it’s own unique history. Among others the only russian shaman in Tuva Dmitry Markov practicing to Adyg- Eeren. The report includes a number of events: ritual for the solar eclipse, ritual for calling of spirits at Kaa- Hem (Valley of Ancestors) at Maly Enisey river, healing of german tourist, healing of french anthropologist Laetitia Merly. Also- ritual of “cleaning” the car, shamans playing chess, working meeting of the group and issuing a “card of shaman”, medical examining of shamans by the doctors of the city clinic. The report was done in collaboration with a french anthropologist, specialist on contemporary shamanism, Doctor Laetitia Merly. The events took place to capital of republic of Tuva, town of Kyzyl in August 2008
See More: http://picturetank.com/v2/?module=site&action=displayContactSheet&randomId=755de4c54c42d66b462711bf77d241f0&lang=en&infoSet=o&orderSet=o&publicLanguagesOnly=1

Chief of Adyg- Eeren, shaman Adyg- Tulush Kara-ool Dopchun-oglu doing a ritual in his office

Chief of Adyg- Eeren, shaman Adyg- Tulush Kara-ool Dopchun-oglu doing a ritual in his office

Ritual of calling for spirits at Kaa- Hem (Valley of Ancestors) at Maly Enisey river. Drying and warming up a ritual drum before the ritual.

Ritual of calling for spirits at Kaa- Hem (Valley of Ancestors) at Maly Enisey river. Drying and warming up a ritual drum before the ritual.

Ritual shamanic drum between "Nivea" and "Adidas" in the offices of Adyg- Eeren

Ritual shamanic drum between “Nivea” and “Adidas” in the offices of Adyg- Eeren


SHAMANS OF SIBERIA – Documentary

In windswept Siberia, shamans have for generations cured illnesses without touching their patients, sung with their diaphragms and controlled the weather. Some can travel over long distances and even levitate, hovering above the birch trees. They regularly communicate with kind and evil spirits. One of them, Tyurgen, manages to balance shamanism with life in industrial Chelyabinsk. Apart from his spiritual activities, he practices a unique musical style – electronic music with folk instruments, throat singing, and folklore-inspired lyrics. We also meet a doctor of anthropology who explains what really goes on in a shaman’s brain when he is in a trance state.

Flight of Shaman - painted by Ginny Hogan

Flight of Shaman – painted by Ginny Hogan